A TISSUE-ENGINEERED JELLYFISH WITH BIOMIMETIC PROPULSION PDF

Thank you for visiting nature. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer. In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

Author:Yolabar Tygole
Country:Chad
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Science
Published (Last):15 January 2008
Pages:426
PDF File Size:15.41 Mb
ePub File Size:1.34 Mb
ISBN:811-5-51287-152-8
Downloads:39499
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Nilar



What is this page? Reverse engineering of biological form and function requires hierarchical design over several orders of space and time. Recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of biosynthetic compound materials, computer-aided design approaches in molecular synthetic biology 4,5 and traditional soft robotics, and increasing aptitude in generating structural and chemical micro environments that promote cellular self-organization have enhanced the ability to recapitulate such hierarchical architecture in engineered biological systems.

Here we combined these capabilities in a systematic design strategy to reverse engineer a muscular pump. We report the construction of a freely swimming jellyfish from chemically dissociated rat tissue and silicone polymer as a proof of concept.

The constructs, termed 'medusoids', were designed with computer simulations and experiments to match key determinants of jellyfish propulsion and feeding performance by quantitatively mimicking structural design, stroke kinematics and animal-fluid interactions.

The combination of the engineering design algorithm with quantitative benchmarks of physiological performance suggests that our strategy is broadly applicable to reverse engineering of muscular organs or simple life forms that pump to survive.

This page is provided by Altmetric. A tissue-engineered jellyfish with biomimetic propulsion Overview of attention for article published in Nature Biotechnology, July Altmetric Badge. High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source 98th percentile. Readers on mendeley Mendeley citeulike 5 CiteULike. Title A tissue-engineered jellyfish with biomimetic propulsion. View on publisher site Alert me about new mentions. Twitter Demographics The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 90 tweeters who shared this research output.

Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled. Mendeley readers. The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record. Attention Score in Context. This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received.

This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January All research outputs.

Outputs of similar age from Nature Biotechnology. Altmetric has tracked 15,, research outputs across all sources so far. So far Altmetric has tracked 6, research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions.

To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the , tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.

Altmetric This page is provided by Altmetric.

THOM HOGAN D7000 PDF

Medusoid, A Tissue-Engineered Jellyfish with the Ability to Swim

Top left: A single jellyfish lappet, or appendage, was multiplied and rotated to form an eight-armed mosaic image suggesting the muscle geometry shown in green. Right: An illustration shows the different stages of analyzing a juvenile jellyfish in order to design and build a tissue-engineered jellyfish. Bottom left: Image of swimming muscle at junction between lappet and main body in a juvenile jellyfish. Right: Colorized image of the tissue-engineered jellyfish in ocean-like saltwater. After thoroughly studying jellyfish propulsion, including the arrangement of their muscles, how their bodies contract and recoil, and how fluid-dynamic effects help or hinder their movements, a team of scientists tissue-engineered a jellyfish with biomimetic propulsion from chemically dissociated rat tissue and silicone polymer. But the animal once was known as the Medusa, after the snake-haired mythological creature its tentacles resemble. Their method for building the tissue-engineered jellyfish, dubbed Medusoid, is outlined in a Nature Biotechnology paper that appears as an advance online publication on July

KETTLER VERSO 107 PDF

050 A tissue-engineered jellyfish with biomimetic propulsion

What is this page? Reverse engineering of biological form and function requires hierarchical design over several orders of space and time. Recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of biosynthetic compound materials, computer-aided design approaches in molecular synthetic biology 4,5 and traditional soft robotics, and increasing aptitude in generating structural and chemical micro environments that promote cellular self-organization have enhanced the ability to recapitulate such hierarchical architecture in engineered biological systems. Here we combined these capabilities in a systematic design strategy to reverse engineer a muscular pump. We report the construction of a freely swimming jellyfish from chemically dissociated rat tissue and silicone polymer as a proof of concept. The constructs, termed 'medusoids', were designed with computer simulations and experiments to match key determinants of jellyfish propulsion and feeding performance by quantitatively mimicking structural design, stroke kinematics and animal-fluid interactions.

BURRINHO PEDRES PDF

A tissue-engineered jellyfish with biomimetic propulsion.

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. DOI: Reverse engineering of biological form and function requires hierarchical design over several orders of space and time.

APPLIED FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS GRIFFEL PDF

A tissue-engineered jellyfish with biomimetic propulsion

Janna C. Nawroth, Hyungsuk Lee, Adam W. Dabiri, Kevin Kit Parker. Reverse engineering of biological form and function requires hierarchical design over several orders of space and time. Recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of biosynthetic compound materials, computer-aided design approaches in molecular synthetic biology and traditional soft robotics, and increasing aptitude in generating structural and chemical microenvironments that promote cellular self-organization have enhanced the ability to recapitulate such hierarchical architecture in engineered biological systems. Here we combined these capabilities in a systematic design strategy to reverse engineer a muscular pump.

Related Articles