ESTETYKA PRAGMATYCZNA SHUSTERMAN PDF

Shusterman, Pra Although known as an American philosopher, I was not academically trained in America; my philosophical education was more European in style — first at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and then at Oxford. Third, the book was in fact published in Europe before it appeared in English. The original English version was not released by Blackwell until April in Britain and elsewhere in Europe ; and the American publication date was much later, since copies did not get there before June. Furthermore, of the fourteen languages into which the book is now translated, eleven of them are European. Without these European translations, the cultural impact of the book would have been much diminished, and I gratefully acknowledge the work of my excellent translators, some of them excellent philosophers in their own right.

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Shusterman, Pra Although known as an American philosopher, I was not academically trained in America; my philosophical education was more European in style — first at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and then at Oxford. Third, the book was in fact published in Europe before it appeared in English. The original English version was not released by Blackwell until April in Britain and elsewhere in Europe ; and the American publication date was much later, since copies did not get there before June.

Furthermore, of the fourteen languages into which the book is now translated, eleven of them are European. Without these European translations, the cultural impact of the book would have been much diminished, and I gratefully acknowledge the work of my excellent translators, some of them excellent philosophers in their own right.

I overcame my initial reluctance and trusted his judgment, which proved marvelously astute. To my relief, as Lindon and Pierre Bourdieu had predicted, the media success did not spoil its academic reception.

Widely distributed, even in train-station kiosks, it was also widely discussed. It not only confirmed my Jamesian intuition that rigorous philosophical reasoning can be rendered enjoyably accessible to the general reader; it also taught me that philosophy needs to take account of the socioeconomic realities that shape its possible forms of expression, if it wants to be expressed and disseminated in the most effective way.

I also learned that a book is essentially a tool for communicative learning rather than an object to be fetishized. If different contexts require different tools, then there was every reason to adjust the book to fit the new cultural contexts of translation. If pragmatism affirms the virtues of pluralism and flexible functionality while highlighting contextuality and enjoyable user experience, then the publication history of Pragmatist Aesthetics certainly manifests this orientation.

The principal points of these commentaries relate to the following general themes: the genealogy of Pragmatist Aesthetics and its relationship to other philosophical traditions or movements; the topics of aesthetic experience and popular art; and the more strictly philosophical questions of experience, interpretation, ontology and the role and limits of language.

Despite the great virtues of analytic aesthetics, I saw there were important issues that were treated with greater richness in continental traditions e. This mainstream status explains why I was asked by The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism — then as now a bastion of analytic aesthetics — to guest-edit a special issue on this topic, which was then published by Blackwell, then famous for cutting-edge anthologies in this field.

The book therefore could appeal to a broad range of readers particularly younger academics who were trained in the analytic tradition in aesthetics and appreciated its merits but were also sensitive, as I was, to its serious limitations.

That was what convinced me to publish my own book Pragmatist Aesthetics in an attractively streamlined French version. These thinkers along with Arthur Danto and Pierre Bourdieu himself an admirer of Wittgensteinian and Austinian analytic philosophy significantly shaped my thinking and helped make Pragmatist Aesthetics a book whose pragmatism is less pure in its sources but which I hope for that reason is more pragmatically pluralist and successful by being less parochial. If I differ sharply from most post-analytic pragmatists particularly Rorty, Goodman, Brandom, and Margolis in insisting on the continuing philosophical value of experience — including non-linguistic, non-interpretive experience, this does not mean devaluing interpretation or language as crucial issues for aesthetics and philosophy.

But it does mean that I also take somatic experience and disciplines of somatic practice quite seriously. I revisit the topic of interpretation later in my remarks, since both Wilkoszewska and Roberta Dreon discuss it at length. Indeed it formed one of the major chapters of my Oxford doctoral dissertation, and I published an earlier version of that chapter while still a graduate student in the important analytic journal, Philosophical Quarterly. Dewey hailed that masterpiece as the book that most influenced his thought; and it repeatedly insists on the continuity of practical, aesthetic, and cognitive interests — themes central to the pragmatist aesthetics that Dewey later developed in Art as Experience which he initially wrote for delivery as the first William James Lectures at Harvard.

Dewey had good tactical reasons at that time to avoid identifying his aesthetic theory as distinctively pragmatist, and some distinguished Dewey scholars today still reject using this term to describe his aesthetic theory. I remain convinced that such attention was indeed essential for advocating a pragmatist aesthetics relevant to the lifeworld of the s and remains necessary today if we want to pursue the pragmatist meliorist project of improving aesthetic expression and experience while maintaining the essentially democratic orientation that inspires the classical pragmatist tradition from its prehistory in Emerson through James and Dewey.

The paradigm of aesthetic experience or judgment is thus a particular experience or a singular judgment: not an experience of, say, sculpture or poetry in general, but rather of this or that particular sculpture or poem. But I worry that Salaverria is interpreting or extending my views in this essentialist way; so let me here reaffirm my pluralism with respect to aesthetic experience and its pleasures. There are many different kinds of aesthetic experience, especially if we take into account the complex and contested character of that concept and do not try to legislate that only one usage of the term is appropriate.

Not all of the experiences or reactions that we call aesthetic are experiences of pleasure; not only are there bad aesthetic experiences that provide no pleasure except by the relief of their ending , but there are also valuable aesthetic experiences that cannot be described as pleasurable.

Some works of contemporary art are valuable in creating intensities of perception, feeling, or intellectual insight that are not really pleasurable and could even be somewhat painful or unpleasant but such experiences can nevertheless be aesthetically powerful and rewarding. Moreover, even if we confine ourselves to pleasurable aesthetic experiences, we need to recognize a variety of pleasures. This plurality of aesthetic pleasures goes beyond the traditional Burkean distinction between the pleasure of beauty and the delight of the sublime: there is pleasantness, amusement, merriment, elation, bliss, rapture, exultation, exhilaration, enjoyment, diversion, entertainment, titillation, fun, gratification, satisfaction, contentment — and so on.

Perfect purity in aesthetics is an overrated ideal, if not also a chimera. Pragmatist Aesthetic appreciates the aesthetic richness of mixing, which is why its rap chapter is important and emblematic. In other words, aesthetic experience and its pleasures can serve other worthy ends besides transformation. One is simply transformed or converted. I therefore resist the idea that all aesthetic pleasures require a lengthy lingering, though certainly the hermeneutic pleasures of art often demand it.

Aesthetic experience can also transform by reinforcing previous, implicit convictions so powerfully that the person is transformed to see those convictions more clearly so that she not only explicitly embraces them but even acts on them. Here again doubt does not seem to play an essential role. Moreover, the eventual resolution of doubt through the problem-solving lingering of inquiry certainly brings significant satisfaction or pleasure.

But to linger over self-doubt, for its own sake, seems more a recipe for depression than transformation. Perhaps Salaverria is led to tout the pleasure of doubt because she emphasizes the lingering of pleasure and sees that doubt demands the lingering of inquiry. I have trouble appreciating her argument because I am not at all clear what she means by doubt. The reason was always a question of economy because these chapters were more technically philosophical and less accessible to non-specialists: the principal economical question was financial because adding the three chapters would make the book both bigger and costlier while also reducing its appeal for the general reader who would have more trouble than interest in reading the technical chapters.

But this points also to economical questions of time and effort — both for the reader and for the translators. The Polish translation generously undertaken initially by two fine philosophers with no financial incentive was taking a very long time to be completed, even as new members were added to the translation team; so I thought that sacrificing the most specialist chapter on interpretation would help bring the book more quickly to completion and be less costly to a Polish university Press that was rightly worried about costs.

Professor Wilkoszewska who superbly coordinated the Polish translation and publication of my later books Practicing Philosophy and Body Consciousness can, I hope, appreciate these economic considerations, just as I admire how she was able to avoid sacrificing any of the chapters in the books of mine that she published with such masterful quality and efficiency.

Yet despite the enormous consensus on its practical importance the logic and methods and limits of interpretation are much contested. As a philosophy that takes practice seriously, pragmatism cannot afford to abandon this issue whose practical impact is immense. I draw a different conclusion: that pragmatist aesthetics needs more than what Dewey provides.

Pragmatist Aesthetics and my subsequent writings show a continuing advocacy of the value of experience as a philosophical concept, against continued attacks on it from powerful philosophical currents including the neopragmatism of Rorty and Brandom.

To ensure a secure place for experience we need to show the limits of interpretation, but to do that we need to treat interpretation seriously. Experience and interpretation should work together, and T. We had the experience but missed the meaning And approach to the meaning restores the experience In a different form, beyond any meaning We can assign to happiness.

I have said before That the past experience revived in the meaning Is not the experience of one life only But of many generations — not forgetting Something that is probably quite ineffable. Rather than one-sidedly choosing or privileging one over the other, my pragmatist strategy is to recognize how these contrasted factors intertwine and to explore how they can both be used to complement each other so as to improve our understanding and our lives.

Our basic understandings are always partial both in the sense of being incomplete and in the sense of being biased or shaped by our interests. Oxford, Blackwell, New York, Rowman and Littlefield, Translations For each translation I provided an additional preface to situate the book in its cultural field. Christine Noille, Paris, Minuit , ch.

Barbara Reiter, Frankfurt, Fischer, , ch. Vesa Mujunen, Helsinki, Gaudeamus, , ch. Fuminori Akiba, Tokyo, Keiso Shobo, , ch. Jinyup Kim, Seoul, Yejun, , ch.

Estetica Pragmatista , trans. Marina Kukartseva, N. Solkalova, V. Barbara Reiter. Vienna: Passagen, The book has no English counterpart. Cometti et al. Cambridge, Mass. It would, moreover, be against my pragmatist view to suppose there is an essential conflict between aesthetic experience and functionality or between aesthetic appreciation of cosmic unity and scientific understanding.

Author retains copyright and grants the European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4. European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy. Contents - Previous document. A Symposium on R. Shusterman, Pragmatist Aesthetics 20 years later. Richard Shusterman. Outline Genealogy and Position in the Philosophical Field. Aesthetic Experience and Popular Art.

Interpretation, Language, and the World. Full text PDF Send by e-mail. Second edition added chapter 10 Somaesthetics: A Disciplinary Proposal Translations For each translation I provided an additional preface to situate the book in its cultural field. Top of page. Copyright Author retains copyright and grants the European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.

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Shusterman, like Dutton Estetyka pragmatyczna. The book also includes an essay on photography by Martin Jay and his detailed response to the other contributors, which has the character of an extended conversation with them. Jedzenie i granice sztuki Book 1 edition published in in Polish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide. Essays in Somaesthetics Dinner as such is a pure performance shustrrman spans only as long as people eat and can never be replicated in the same form. Estetyka pragmatyczna,Practicing Philosophy: You also have the right to deny or limit the authorisation. Dlaczego Pragmatycza by Dorota Koczanowicz 1 edition published in in Polish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide.

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